Nintendo Research & Development 2

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Nintendo Research & Development 2
Type Division of Nintendo
Founded 1972 (staff members reassigned in 2003)
Headquarters Kyoto, Japan
Key people Masayuki Uemura, manager (1972 - 2003)
Industry Video games
Products Video game consoles
Video game hardware
Video games
Employees undisclosed
Website http://www.nintendo.com/

Nintendo Research & Development 2 (任天堂開発第二部, R&D2) was the second video game development group within Nintendo. It was managed by Masayuki Uemura from its creation in 1972 until Nintendo's internal development groups were restructured by Nintendo president Satoru Iwata in 2003. Staff members of Nintendo Research & Development 2 were reassigned to Nintendo Software Planning & Development.

Formation of Nintendo Research & Development 2

In 1972, Masayuki Uemura joined Nintendo, after having previously worked at Sharp Corporation. He assisted Gunpei Yokoi of Nintendo Research & Development with solar cell engineering for the Beam Gun line of toys. After this, Uemura was assigned to manage a new division within Nintendo, Nintendo Research & Development 2. This division was in charge of creating hardware and peripherals, although it ported several arcade games to home systems, and it is credited with the creation of several video games as well.

Color TV-Game

In the mid-1970s, several companies sought to capitalize on the popularity of Atari's Pong, and Nintendo was among them. Thus, came the creation of the Color TV-Game series. The first two systems, Color TV-Game 6 and Color TV-Game 15, both released in 1978, were Pong clones, offering variations of tennis, hockey and volleyball, in single and doubles mode. The main difference between the two, other than the different variations of playable games, were that Color TV-Game 6 had its two controllers attached to the system itself, and Color TV-Game 15 had its two controllers attached to cables.

1978 saw the release of Color TV-Game Racing 112, which was a break from the bat and ball mold in that it was a racing game with switches on the side that allowed play of 112 variants of the game. It was playable either with the steering wheel or with two wired controllers for two player games. The final two releases were home versions of arcade games created by Nintendo R&D1. The first, released in 1979, was Color TV-Game Block Breaker, a home release of Block Fever. The final release in the Color TV-Game line was released in 1980. It was titled Computer TV-Game, and was a home release of Computer Othello.

The cases of the Color TV-Game Racing 112 and the Color TV-Game Block Breaker were designed by Shigeru Miyamoto in his first assignments at Nintendo.

Nintendo Entertainment System

Nintendo's first successful home console, the Nintendo Entertainment System, was created by Nintendo R&D2 as well. When it was released in Japan in 1983, as the Family Computer, Nintendo R&D2 created several games for the system. These games included home versions of the arcade games Donkey Kong, Donkey Kong Junior and Mario Bros., the educational games Popeye's English Game (ポパイの英語遊び, Popeye no Eigo Asobi) and Donkey Kong Math, as well as Mahjong and Baseball.

Games by Nintendo Research and Development 2

Title Platform Released Added to Museum Notes
Donkey Kong NES
GameCube
Nintendo e-Reader
NES Classic Edition
1983
2002
2002
2016
January 20, 2003
June 22, 2017
August 10, 2017
January 20, 2018
Nintendo R&D2 ported Nintendo R&D1's arcade game to the Nintendo Entertainment System.
The WEC Museum owns Animal Crossing for GameCube, in which the NES version of Donkey Kong is included.
The WEC Museum owns the NES version on Donkey Kong-e on the e-Reader for the Game Boy Advance.
The WEC Museum owns NES Classic Edition and Famicom Mini, on which the NES version of Donkey Kong is included.
Donkey Kong Junior NES
GameCube
Nintendo e-Reader
NES Classic Edition
1983
2002
2016
2016
January 20, 2003
June 22, 2017
August 10, 2017
Nintendo R&D2 ported Nintendo R&D1's arcade game to the Nintendo Entertainment System.
The WEC Museum owns Animal Crossing for GameCube, in which the NES version of Donkey Kong Junior is included.
The WEC Museum owns the NES version on Donkey Kong Jr.-e on the e-Reader for the Game Boy Advance.
The WEC Museum owns NES Classic Edition and Famicom Mini, on which the NES version of Donkey Kong Junior is included.
Donkey Kong Jr. Math NES 1983
2002
January 20, 2003 Nintendo R&D2 released Donkey Kong Jr. Math for the Nintendo Entertainment System.
The WEC Museum owns Animal Crossing for GameCube, in which the NES version of Donkey Kong Jr. Math is included.
Donkey Kong 3 NES
GameCube
Nintendo e-Reader
1983
2002
2002
January 20, 2003 Nintendo R&D2 ported Nintendo R&D1's arcade game to the Nintendo Entertainment System.
The WEC Museum owns Animal Crossing for GameCube, in which Donkey Kong 3 is included.
The NES version is on Donkey Kong 3-e on the e-Reader for the Game Boy Advance.
Mahjong Famicom
Nintendo 64
GameCube
1983
2001
2001
Not yet. Nintendo R&D2 released Mahjong for the Famicom.
The Famicom version of Mahjong was included in Animal Forest for the Nintendo 64.
The Famicom version of Mahjong was included in Animal Forest for the GameCube.
Mario Open Golf Famicom 1991
2016
August 10, 2017 Nintendo R&D2 released Mario Open Golf for the Famicom.
The WEC Museum owns the Famicom Mini, on which the Famicom version of Mario Open Golf is included.
NES Open Tournament Golf Famicom 1991 Not yet Nintendo R&D2 released NES Open Tournament Golf for the Nintendo Entertainment System.