Difference between revisions of "Floppy disk"

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{{Infobox_Peripheral |
 
{{Infobox_Peripheral |
 
   peripheral_name  = Floppy disk|
 
   peripheral_name  = Floppy disk|
   peripheral_image = [[File:Floppy_disk.png|300px]]|
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   peripheral_image = [[File:Floppy_disk.png|310px]]|
   developer        = [[IBM]] (8-inch)<br />[[Shugart|Shugart Associates]] (5¼-inch)<br />[[Sony]] (3½-inch)<br />[[Apple]] (-inch FileWare)|
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   developer        = [[Apple]] (5¼-inch FileWare)<br />[[IBM]] (8-inch)<br />[[Matsushita]] (3-inch Compact Floppy Disk)<br />[[Mitsumi]] (2⅘-inch Quick Disk)<br />[[Shugart|Shugart Associates]] (5¼-inch)<br />[[Sony]] (3½-inch, 2-inch Video Floppy)<br />[[Zenith]] (2-inch LT-1)|
 
   publisher        = Various|
 
   publisher        = Various|
 
   systems          = Various|
 
   systems          = Various|
   release          = 8-inch: 1967<br />5¼-inch: September 1976<br />3½-inch: 1981<br />5¼-inch FileWare: January 19, 1983|
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   release          = 8-inch: 1967<br />5¼-inch: September 1976<br />3½-inch: 1981<br />5¼-inch FileWare: January 19, 1983<br />2⅘-inch Quick Disk: 1985<br />3-inch Compact Floppy Disk: May 1985<br />2-inch Video Floppy: 1987<br />2-inch LT-1: 1989|
   added_to_museum = December 25, 1980|
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   added_to_museum = 5¼-inch: December 25, 1980<br />3½-inch: December 25, 1989|
 
}}
 
}}
The '''Floppy disk''', '''floppy''', '''disk''', or '''diskette''', is a magnetic storage format.  
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A '''Floppy disk''', '''floppy''', '''disk''', or '''diskette''', is a magnetic storage format.  
  
 
==8-inch floppy==
 
==8-inch floppy==
In 1967, [[IBM]] released the 8-inch floppy disk for use with their [[System/370]] mainframe [[computer]]s.
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In 1967, [[IBM]] released the 8-inch floppy disk for use with their [[System/370]] mainframe [[computer]]s.  
  
 
==5¼-inch minifloppy==
 
==5¼-inch minifloppy==
[[Shugart|Shugart Associates]] released the 5¼-inch minifloppy in September 1976.
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[[Shugart|Shugart Associates]] released the 5¼-inch minifloppy in September 1976. These were developed to create a smaller disk to replace the 8-inch floppies. The 5¼-inch minifloppy became an industry standard, and were used in many different computer architectures.
  
 
==3½-inch floppy==
 
==3½-inch floppy==
[[Sony]] released the 3½-inch floppy in 1981. This format had a hard plastic case that protected the magnetic disk.
+
[[Sony]] released the 3½-inch floppy in 1981. This format had a hard plastic case that protected the magnetic disk. These were created to replace the 5¼-inch minifloppy by creating a smaller disk that could not be easily bent like previous formats.  
  
 
==5¼-inch FileWare==
 
==5¼-inch FileWare==
 
On January 19, 1983, [[Apple]] released the proprietary 5¼-inch FileWare, code-named "Twiggy", for use in their [[Lisa]] computer. The FileWare format is similar to the standard 5¼-inch minifloppy, however, it has additional write windows on the top of the disk, and the label runs down the side.
 
On January 19, 1983, [[Apple]] released the proprietary 5¼-inch FileWare, code-named "Twiggy", for use in their [[Lisa]] computer. The FileWare format is similar to the standard 5¼-inch minifloppy, however, it has additional write windows on the top of the disk, and the label runs down the side.
 +
 +
==2⅘-inch Quick Disk==
 +
[[Mitsumi]] released the 2⅘-inch quick disk in 1985. It was used in the [[Family Computer Disk System]], released in Japan by [[Nintendo]] in 1986.
 +
 +
==3-inch CF-2/Compact Floppy Disk==
 +
In May 1985, a consortium of companies led by [[Matsushita]] released the 3-inch Compact Floppy Disk, or CF-2. It was used by [[Amstrad]] in the [[Amstrad CPC]], [[Amstrad PCW]], and [[ZX Spectrum|ZX Spectrum +3]] computers, by [[Sega]] in the [[Super Control Station SF-7000]] add-on for the [[SC-3000]] computer, by [[Tatung]] in the [[Tatung Einstein]] computer, by [[Timex]] in their FDD drives and in the [[Timex FDD3000]] computer.
 +
 +
==2-inch Video Floppy==
 +
In 1981, Sony unveiled the Mavipak, a 2-inch magnetic floppy disk that would store analog still video recordings. It was intended for its [[Mavica]] camera, however the Mavica remained as various prototypes until the Mavica MVC-A7AF was released in 1987. It used the Mavipak disk format, then known as the Video Floppy. It was also used by other companies in their analog still-video cameras, as well as in various medical fields and by television stations.
 +
 +
==2-inch LT-1==
 +
In 1989, [[Zenith]] released the proprietary 2-inch LT-1 floppy disk, for use in the [[Zenith Minisport]] laptop computer.
  
 
[[Category:Storage media]]
 
[[Category:Storage media]]

Latest revision as of 19:56, 10 February 2020

Floppy disk.png
Floppy disk
Developer Apple (5¼-inch FileWare)
IBM (8-inch)
Matsushita (3-inch Compact Floppy Disk)
Mitsumi (2⅘-inch Quick Disk)
Shugart Associates (5¼-inch)
Sony (3½-inch, 2-inch Video Floppy)
Zenith (2-inch LT-1)
Publisher Various
Systems Various
Released 8-inch: 1967
5¼-inch: September 1976
3½-inch: 1981
5¼-inch FileWare: January 19, 1983
2⅘-inch Quick Disk: 1985
3-inch Compact Floppy Disk: May 1985
2-inch Video Floppy: 1987
2-inch LT-1: 1989
Added to Museum 5¼-inch: December 25, 1980
3½-inch: December 25, 1989

A Floppy disk, floppy, disk, or diskette, is a magnetic storage format.

8-inch floppy

In 1967, IBM released the 8-inch floppy disk for use with their System/370 mainframe computers.

5¼-inch minifloppy

Shugart Associates released the 5¼-inch minifloppy in September 1976. These were developed to create a smaller disk to replace the 8-inch floppies. The 5¼-inch minifloppy became an industry standard, and were used in many different computer architectures.

3½-inch floppy

Sony released the 3½-inch floppy in 1981. This format had a hard plastic case that protected the magnetic disk. These were created to replace the 5¼-inch minifloppy by creating a smaller disk that could not be easily bent like previous formats.

5¼-inch FileWare

On January 19, 1983, Apple released the proprietary 5¼-inch FileWare, code-named "Twiggy", for use in their Lisa computer. The FileWare format is similar to the standard 5¼-inch minifloppy, however, it has additional write windows on the top of the disk, and the label runs down the side.

2⅘-inch Quick Disk

Mitsumi released the 2⅘-inch quick disk in 1985. It was used in the Family Computer Disk System, released in Japan by Nintendo in 1986.

3-inch CF-2/Compact Floppy Disk

In May 1985, a consortium of companies led by Matsushita released the 3-inch Compact Floppy Disk, or CF-2. It was used by Amstrad in the Amstrad CPC, Amstrad PCW, and ZX Spectrum +3 computers, by Sega in the Super Control Station SF-7000 add-on for the SC-3000 computer, by Tatung in the Tatung Einstein computer, by Timex in their FDD drives and in the Timex FDD3000 computer.

2-inch Video Floppy

In 1981, Sony unveiled the Mavipak, a 2-inch magnetic floppy disk that would store analog still video recordings. It was intended for its Mavica camera, however the Mavica remained as various prototypes until the Mavica MVC-A7AF was released in 1987. It used the Mavipak disk format, then known as the Video Floppy. It was also used by other companies in their analog still-video cameras, as well as in various medical fields and by television stations.

2-inch LT-1

In 1989, Zenith released the proprietary 2-inch LT-1 floppy disk, for use in the Zenith Minisport laptop computer.